Resources

A multi-source collection of readings, tools, videos, and webinars to help you understand and implement Zero Suicide.

Displaying 31 - 45 of 94
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In 2014, six states and their provider partners set out with the Suicide Prevention Resource Center and the National Council for Behavioral Health on the Zero Suicide Breakthrough Seriesa project designed to learn how best to support the successful launch and implementation of the Zero Suicide approach under the direction of a state mental health or public health office. State leaders who had already begun the process of launching Zero Suicide initiatives were asked to invite a provider organization to partner with them in the process. Over the course of the nine-month Breakthrough Series period, they were given additional technical assistance and supports to move towards suicide safer care practices. This report details lessons learned throughout the process.

Identify | Web

Pisani, A. R., Murrie, D. C., & Silverman, M. M. (2015). Reformulating Suicide Risk Formulation: From Prediction to Prevention. Academic Psychiatry, 1–7. 

Train | PDF

The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention released the comprehensive Suicide Prevention and the Clinical Workforce: Guidelines for Training to assure that the U.S. clinical workforce is adequately prepared to treat persons at risk for suicide. The Action Alliance’s Clinical Workforce Preparedness Task Force spent over three years developing the guidelines to serve as the foundation for creating suicide prevention training programs in health and human services professions, such as nursing, social work, medicine, school counseling, and the full range of behavioral health and primary care disciplines. This initiative was designed so that each discipline could use the guidelines to develop specific continuing education curricula and train new clinicians to deliver optimal suicide care.

Improve | Web

Coffey, M. J. (2015). Perfect Depression Care Spread: The Traction of Zero Suicides. JCOM, 22(3).

Transition | Web

Boyer, C. A., McAlpine, D. D., Pottick, K. J., & Olfson, M. (2000). Identifying risk factors and key strategies in linkage to outpatient psychiatric care. American Journal of Psychiatry, 157(10), 1592-1598.

Treat | Web

Boyer, C. A., McAlpine, D. D., Pottick, K. J., & Olfson, M. (2000). Identifying risk factors and key strategies in linkage to outpatient psychiatric care. American Journal of Psychiatry, 157(10), 1592-1598.

Treat | Web

Reducing a suicidal person’s access to highly lethal means is an important part of a comprehensive approach to suicide prevention. This website from the Harvard School of Public Health describes how a person attempts suicide plays an important role in whether they live or die.

Treat | Web

Ahmedani, B. K., & Vannoy, S. (2014). National pathways for suicide prevention and health services research. American journal of preventive medicine, 47(3), S222-S228.

Treat | Web

Comtois, K. A., Jobes, D. A., S O'Connor, S., Atkins, D. C., Janis, K., E Chessen, C., ... & Yuodelis‐Flores, C. (2011). Collaborative assessment and management of suicidality (CAMS): feasibility trial for next‐day appointment services. Depression and Anxiety, 28(11), 963-972.

Treat | Web

Stanley, B., Brown, G., Brent, D. A., Wells, K., Poling, K., Curry, J., ... & Hughes, J. (2009). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP): treatment model, feasibility, and acceptability. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 48(10), 1005-1013.

Treat | Web

Berrouiguet, S., Gravey, M., Le Galudec, M., Alavi, Z., & Walter, M. (2014). Post-acute crisis text messaging outreach for suicide prevention: A pilot study. Psychiatry research, 217(3), 154-157.

Transition | Web

Luxton, D. D., June, J. D., & Comtois, K. A. (2013). Can postdischarge follow-up contacts prevent suicide and suicidal behavior? A review of the evidence. Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention, 34(1), 32.

Transition | Web

This comprehensive report authored by David Knesper, M.D., Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, offers recommendations for the ongoing care of patients at risk for suicide who have been treated in emergency departments and hospitals. It includes ten principles for improved continuity of care, and provides real-world examples of seven integrated systems of care in the U.S. and Europe. Other key recommendations for practice and research address: targeting high-risk individuals; improving education and training for suicide risk assessment; responding to patients who have become disengaged from treatment; coordinating care; and improving infrastructure to provide continuity of care.

Improve | Web

Coffey, M. J., Coffey, C. E., & Ahmedani, B. K. (2015). Suicide in a Health Maintenance Organization Population. JAMA psychiatry.

Treat | Web

Rudd, M., Mandrusiak, M., & Joiner, T.E., Jr. (2006). The case against no-suicide contracts: The commitment to treatment statement as a practice alternative. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 62(2), 243-251.

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SPRC and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention are able to make this web site available thanks to support from Universal Health Services (UHS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (grant 1 U79 SM0559945).

No official endorsement by SAMHSA, DHHS, or UHS for the information on this web site is intended or should be inferred.