Resources

A multi-source collection of readings, tools, videos, and webinars to help you understand and implement Zero Suicide.

Displaying 31 - 45 of 89
Treat | Web

Boyer, C. A., McAlpine, D. D., Pottick, K. J., & Olfson, M. (2000). Identifying risk factors and key strategies in linkage to outpatient psychiatric care. American Journal of Psychiatry, 157(10), 1592-1598.

Treat | Web

Reducing a suicidal person’s access to highly lethal means is an important part of a comprehensive approach to suicide prevention. This website from the Harvard School of Public Health describes how a person attempts suicide plays an important role in whether they live or die.

Treat | Web

Ahmedani, B. K., & Vannoy, S. (2014). National pathways for suicide prevention and health services research. American journal of preventive medicine, 47(3), S222-S228.

Treat | Web

Comtois, K. A., Jobes, D. A., S O'Connor, S., Atkins, D. C., Janis, K., E Chessen, C., ... & Yuodelis‐Flores, C. (2011). Collaborative assessment and management of suicidality (CAMS): feasibility trial for next‐day appointment services. Depression and Anxiety, 28(11), 963-972.

Treat | Web

Stanley, B., Brown, G., Brent, D. A., Wells, K., Poling, K., Curry, J., ... & Hughes, J. (2009). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP): treatment model, feasibility, and acceptability. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 48(10), 1005-1013.

Treat | Web

Berrouiguet, S., Gravey, M., Le Galudec, M., Alavi, Z., & Walter, M. (2014). Post-acute crisis text messaging outreach for suicide prevention: A pilot study. Psychiatry research, 217(3), 154-157.

Transition | Web

Luxton, D. D., June, J. D., & Comtois, K. A. (2013). Can postdischarge follow-up contacts prevent suicide and suicidal behavior? A review of the evidence. Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention, 34(1), 32.

Transition | Web

This comprehensive report authored by David Knesper, M.D., Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, offers recommendations for the ongoing care of patients at risk for suicide who have been treated in emergency departments and hospitals. It includes ten principles for improved continuity of care, and provides real-world examples of seven integrated systems of care in the U.S. and Europe. Other key recommendations for practice and research address: targeting high-risk individuals; improving education and training for suicide risk assessment; responding to patients who have become disengaged from treatment; coordinating care; and improving infrastructure to provide continuity of care.

Improve | Web

Coffey, M. J., Coffey, C. E., & Ahmedani, B. K. (2015). Suicide in a Health Maintenance Organization Population. JAMA psychiatry.

Treat | Web

Rudd, M., Mandrusiak, M., & Joiner, T.E., Jr. (2006). The case against no-suicide contracts: The commitment to treatment statement as a practice alternative. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 62(2), 243-251.

Treat | Web

This document provides recommendations for the assessment, treatment, and risk management of patients with suicidal behaviors. A Quick Reference Guide is also available at http://psychiatryonline.org/pb/assets/raw/sitewide/practice_guidelines/guidelines/suicide-guide.pdf/

Treat | Web

Jobes, D. A. (2006). Managing suicidal risk: A collaborative approach. Guilford Press.

Treat | Web

Wenzel, A., Brown, G. K., & Beck, A. T. (2009). Cognitive therapy for suicidal patients: Scientific and clinical applications. American Psychological Association.

Treat | Web

Brown, G. K., & Jager-Hyman, S. (2014). Evidence-based psychotherapies for suicide prevention: future directions. American journal of preventive medicine, 47(3), S186-S194.

Improve | Web

Weiss, A. P. (2009). Quality improvement in healthcare: the six Ps of root-cause analysis. Am J Psychiatry, 166(372).

Pages

Refine Your Search

Browse by element of the Zero Suicide model and/or type of resource.

Type

SPRC and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention are able to make this web site available thanks to support from Universal Health Services (UHS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (grant 1 U79 SM0559945).

No official endorsement by SAMHSA, DHHS, or UHS for the information on this web site is intended or should be inferred.