Resources

A multi-source collection of readings, tools, videos, and webinars to help you understand and implement Zero Suicide.

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6
Transition | PDF

The Puyallup Tribal Health Authority developed a caring letter template that includes caring phrases in the Puyallup language with English translations. These culturally appropriate caring letters are sent in envelopes to protect client confidentiality.

Transition | PDF

Bloomington Meadows Hospital of Indiana sends out handwritten care cards to patients after discharge. The care cards, like the two examples here, are created by receptionists, signed by the staff, and sent in an envelope for privacy. 

Transition | PDF

Community Counseling Center of Missouri invites clients to design caring contact cards through on-going contests. This collaboration with clients is designed to demonstrate provider care and reaffirm that lived experience matters to the Center. 

Transition | PDF

Centerstone of Tennessee developed this caring letter—in English and Spanish—with the help of Leah Harris. It is designed to be sent after other follow-up procedures (e.g., clinicians or others trained to do follow-up calls have reached out) have not been successful in reaching an individual who has been under your care.

Transition | PDF

Centerstone of Tennessee developed this Memorandum of Understanding with emergency departments to enhance follow-up services for clients.

Transition | Web

This free, online training from the New York State Office of Mental Health and Columbia University describes what structured follow-up and monitoring is and how it can help suicidal individuals. Participants learn the typical three step procedure for conducting a structured follow-up. Behavioral healthcare practitioners in New York State working in non-profit settings can receive a certificate of completion by completing the training through the Center for Practice Innovations (CPI) Learning Community. Practitioners outside of New York State are not eligible to receive a certificate of completion.

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SPRC and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention are able to make this web site available thanks to support from Universal Health Services (UHS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (grant 1 U79 SM0559945).

No official endorsement by SAMHSA, DHHS, or UHS for the information on this web site is intended or should be inferred.