Resources

A multi-source collection of readings, tools, videos, and webinars to help you understand and implement Zero Suicide.

Displaying 1 - 15 of 55
Treat | Web

TreamentWorksForVets is a public information website for veterans, family members, and others interested in learning more about proven mental health treatments for veterans. The website uses easy to follow animations, creative videos, and interactive exercises to explain Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia. TreatmentWorksforVets was created by experts in veterans mental health to increase awareness of evidence-based psychotherapies and is supported by the VA Rocky Mountain MIRECC (Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center) for Suicide Prevention.

Train | PDF

Adapted by the THRIVE project at the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, this document can help all types of organizations understand their Zero Suicide Workforce Survey results. The document includes discussion questions and statements to guide implementing teams through a conversation about their results. 

Identify | Web

The Ask Suicide-Screening Questions (ASQ) Toolkit is a free resource for medical settings (emergency department, inpatient medical/surgical units, outpatient clinics/primary care) that can help nurses or physicians successfully identify youth at risk for suicide. The ASQ is a set of four screening questions that takes 20 seconds to administer. The Ask Suicide-Screening Questions (ASQ) toolkit is designed for screening youth ages 10-24 (for patients with mental health chief complaints, consider screening below age 10). The ASQ is free of charge and available in multiple languages.

Identify | Web

The Rocky Mountain MIRECC for Suicide Prevention, part of the Department of Veterans Affairs, is offering a free consultation program for any clinician and provider who works with any Veteran at risk for suicide. Consultation topics may include things like risk assessment, conceptualization of suicide risk, lethal means safety counseling, strategies for how to engage veterans at high risk, best practices for documentation, provider support after a suicide loss, and more. 

Train | PDF

Tips and case studies from Zero Suicide implementors to help improve the response rates for your organization's workforce survey rollout.

Engage | Web

The Department of Veteran's Affairs developed a Mental Health Guide that offers recommended products and solutions to ensure individuals in inpatient care have a safe and therapeutically-enriching environment.

Engage | Web

The Department of Veteran's Affairs developed a Mental Health Environment of Care Checklist for Veterans Affairs Hospitals to use to review inpatient mental health units for environmental hazards. The purpose of the checklist is to identify and abate environmental hazards that could increase the chance of patient suicide or self-harm. 

Transition | PDF

The Puyallup Tribal Health Authority developed a caring letter template that includes caring phrases in the Puyallup language with English translations. These culturally appropriate caring letters are sent in envelopes to protect client confidentiality.

Transition | PDF

Bloomington Meadows Hospital of Indiana sends out handwritten care cards to patients after discharge. The care cards, like the two examples here, are created by receptionists, signed by the staff, and sent in an envelope for privacy. 

Train | PDF

The Institute for Family Health makes it a policy to provide all staff in their Psychosocial Services Department with training on suicide prevention. This document provides examples of IFH's regularly-offered trainings and the trainings required for each institutional role.

Transition | PDF

Community Counseling Center of Missouri invites clients to design caring contact cards through on-going contests. This collaboration with clients is designed to demonstrate provider care and reaffirm that lived experience matters to the Center. 

Engage | PDF

This document outlines the standard operating procedure for suicide risk assessment at Centerstone of Tennessee. The document supports Centerstone's policy that all individuals be screened for suicide risk at every service contact during the course of treatment.

Engage | PDF

The Institute for Family Health created a Managing Suicidality: Clinical Pathways in Primary and Behavioral Health Care resource to guide staff through their organization's approach to identification and response. 

Transition | PDF

Centerstone of Tennessee developed this caring letter—in English and Spanish—with the help of Leah Harris. It is designed to be sent after other follow-up procedures (e.g., clinicians or others trained to do follow-up calls have reached out) have not been successful in reaching an individual who has been under your care.

Train | PDF

This is a sample Zero Suicide Workforce Survey results report with randomly generated responses. You can use this as a guide to help you plan your survey analysis and communication about your survey results with staff.

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SPRC and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention are able to make this web site available thanks to support from Universal Health Services (UHS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (grant 1 U79 SM0559945).

No official endorsement by SAMHSA, DHHS, or UHS for the information on this web site is intended or should be inferred.