Resources

A multi-source collection of readings, tools, videos, and webinars to help you understand and implement Zero Suicide.

Displaying 1 - 14 of 14
Identify | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Identify element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Lead | Web

In this podcast trilogy, Rocky Mountain Short host Adam Hoffberg interviews three key Zero Suicide Champions who attended the 50th annual American Association of Suicidology conference. 

In "An Introduction to the Zero Suicide Initiative," Julie Goldstein-Grumet, who oversees the Zero Suicide Institute in her role as the Director of Health and Behavioral Health Initiatives at the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, discusses the foundation of Zero Suicide. She offers strategic direction to improve the effectiveness of behavioral health, clinical care, and primary care providers to recognize and respond to suicide emergencies.

Anthony Pisani of the University of Rochester Center for the Study and Prevention of Suicide discusses his model for suicide safer care, prevention-oriented risk formulation, and the need for a common framework for assessing, communicating, and responding to suicide risk for clinicians, patients, and the medical record in "A New Take on Zero Suicide and Risk Formulation."

Speaking from the Henry For Health System Center for Health Services Research, Brian Ahmandani discusses how the Zero Suicide initiative fits with the Center's investigation of ways to improve the quality, efficiency, and equality of health care. "Suicide Prevention in Health Systems" also discusses recent research findings on suicide preventions in health systems.

Identify | Web

Pisani, A. R., Murrie, D. C., & Silverman, M. M. (2015). Reformulating Suicide Risk Formulation: From Prediction to Prevention. Academic Psychiatry, 1–7. 

Identify | Web

Posner, K., Brown, G. K., Stanley, B., Brent, D. A., Yershova, K. V., Oquendo, M., . . . Mann, J. J. (2011). The Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS): Initial validity and internal consistency findings from three multi-site studies with adolescents and adults. American Journal of Psychiatry, 168(12): 1233–1234.

Identify | Web

Douglas, K. S., & Skeem, J. L. (2005). Violence risk assessment: Getting specific about being dynamic. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 11(3), 347.

Identify | Web

Bryan, C. J., & Rudd, M. D. (2006). Advances in the assessment of suicide risk. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 62(2), 185–200.

Identify | Web

Berman, A. L., & Silverman, M. M. (2014). Suicide risk assessment and risk formulation part II: Suicide risk formulation and the determination of levels of risk. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 44(4), 432–443.

Identify | Web

Silverman, M. M., & Berman, A. L. (2014). Suicide risk assessment and risk formulation part I: A focus on suicide ideation in assessing suicide risk. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 44(4), 420–431.

Identify | Web

This document serves as a resource guide, using the SAFE-T protocol as a centerpiece, to facilitate implementation of the Joint Commission patient safety goal on suicide.

Identify | Web

This report reviews evidence about suicide risk factors and suicide risk assessment tools to inform practice guidelines for clinicians serving veterans and military populations. However, much of the information is also applicable to the general adult population.

Identify | Web

These comprehensive guidelines outline a framework for structured assessment of adults suspected to be at risk of suicide and the immediate and long-term management and treatment that should follow if an individual is found to be at risk. A summary version is available at this link: http://www.healthquality.va.gov/guidelines/MH/srb/VASuicideAssessmentSummaryPRINT.pdf

Identify | Web

Fowler , J. C. (2012). Suicide risk assessment in clinical practice: Pragmatic guidelines for imperfect assessments. Psychotherapy49(1), 81–90. 

Identify | Web

Simon , G. E., Rutter, C. M., Peterson, D., Oliver, M., Whiteside, U., Operskalski, B., & Ludman, E. J. (2013). Does response on the PHQ-9 Depression Questionnaire predict subsequent suicide attempt or suicide death? Psychiatric Services, 64(12), 1195–1202.

Identify | Web

This publication introduces two approaches to evaluating suicide risk and provides links to resources that offer additional guidance on choosing and implementing suicide screening and assessment programs.

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SPRC and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention are able to make this web site available thanks to support from Universal Health Services (UHS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (grant 1 U79 SM0559945).

No official endorsement by SAMHSA, DHHS, or UHS for the information on this web site is intended or should be inferred.