Resources

A multi-source collection of readings, tools, videos, and webinars to help you understand and implement Zero Suicide.

Displaying 1 - 15 of 86
Improve | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Improve element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Transition | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Transition element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Treat | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Treat element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Engage | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Engage element of the Zero Suicide approach, focusing on safety planning.

Engage | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Engage element of the Zero Suicide approach, focusing on access to lethal means.

Engage | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Engage element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Identify | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Identify element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Train | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Train element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Lead | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Lead element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Lead | Web

In this podcast trilogy, Rocky Mountain Short host Adam Hoffberg interviews three key Zero Suicide Champions who attended the 50th annual American Association of Suicidology conference. 

In "An Introduction to the Zero Suicide Initiative," Julie Goldstein-Grumet, who oversees the Zero Suicide Institute in her role as the Director of Health and Behavioral Health Initiatives at the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, discusses the foundation of Zero Suicide. She offers strategic direction to improve the effectiveness of behavioral health, clinical care, and primary care providers to recognize and respond to suicide emergencies.

Anthony Pisani of the University of Rochester Center for the Study and Prevention of Suicide discusses his model for suicide safer care, prevention-oriented risk formulation, and the need for a common framework for assessing, communicating, and responding to suicide risk for clinicians, patients, and the medical record in "A New Take on Zero Suicide and Risk Formulation."

Speaking from the Henry For Health System Center for Health Services Research, Brian Ahmandani discusses how the Zero Suicide initiative fits with the Center's investigation of ways to improve the quality, efficiency, and equality of health care. "Suicide Prevention in Health Systems" also discusses recent research findings on suicide preventions in health systems.

Engage | Web

"Rocky Mountain Short Takes on Suicide Prevention: Talking to Patients about Firearm Safety" is a conversation about firearm safety between the host, Adam Hoffberg, and Emmy Betz, an emergency room physician at the University of Colorado Hospital. The conversation covers a range of topics regarding lethal means reduction. One of the highlights is a Colorado program called the Colorado Gun Shop Project, which is a collaboration with gun shop retailers, gun range owners, and firearm safety course instructors to promote suicide prevention. The podcast is twenty-six minutes long and can be found at the Rocky Mountain MIRECC for Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention website.

Lead | Web

In this podcast, Jonathan B. Singer, Ph.D., LCSW interviews David W. Covington, LPC, MBA regarding the importance of healthcare systems adopting and implementing Zero Suicide initiatives.

Suicide Care Management Plan | Web

The Real Warriors Campaign is a multimedia public awareness campaign designed to encourage help-seeking behavior among service members, veterans and military families coping with invisible wounds. Launched by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) in 2009, the campaign is an integral part of the Defense Department’s overall effort to encourage warriors and families to seek appropriate care and support for psychological health concerns.

There is an increased focus on providing evidence-based care in both the military and civilian health care systems. Since 1998, the Defense Department (DoD) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have worked together to develop CPGs for treating psychological and physical health concerns. The departments’ working groups create the guidelines based, in part, on the readiness needs of service members and veterans.

The Institute of Medicine defines clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) as “statements that include recommendations intended to optimize patient care that are informed by a systematic review of evidence and an assessment of the benefits and harms of alternative care options.”

CPGs create consistency of care. They can support provider and patient decisions about appropriate care for specific concerns but should not replace a provider’s best judgment.

Potential Benefits for Health Professionals

CPG use can lead to a number of advantages that positively affect both the providers and patients. If implemented correctly, CPGs can:

  • Improve quality of clinical decisions and care
  • Offer clear recommendations for providers
  • Promote efficient use of resources
  • Streamline access to resources
Screening and Assessment | Web

Most clinicians-in-training learn to summarize suicide risk in a categorical probability judgment expressed as low, moderate, or high, often with gradations like low-moderate. But what do we really mean when we say a patient is at “low” “moderate” or “high” risk? Risk compared to whom? Compared to when? In what setting? These labels are devoid of context, lack predictive validity, and provide little help when developing plans and responses to prevent suicide.  In this Suicide Prevention Resource Center Director's Corner, Anthony Pisani, PhD explains moving away from a prediction model to a prevention model.

Lead | Web

Copyrighted and published by Project HOPE/Health Affairs as: Michael F. Hogan and Julie Goldstein Grumet “Suicide Prevention: An Emerging Priority For Health Care” Health Affairs (Millwood) 2016, Vol. 35, No. 6, 1084-1090. The published article is archived and available online at www.healthaffairs.org.

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SPRC and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention are able to make this web site available thanks to support from Universal Health Services (UHS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (grant 1 U79 SM0559945).

No official endorsement by SAMHSA, DHHS, or UHS for the information on this web site is intended or should be inferred.