Resources

A multi-source collection of readings, tools, videos, and webinars to help you understand and implement Zero Suicide.

Displaying 61 - 75 of 160
Lead | Web

Becky Stoll, Vice President for Crisis and Disaster Management at Centerstone, and Virna Little, Senior Vice President—Psychosocial Services at the Institute for Family Health, describe their respective strategies for involving leadership in a Zero Suicide initiative.

Lead | Web

Mike Hogan, Co-chair of the Zero Suicide Advisory Group, talks about applying the core concepts of the patient safety movement to prevent suicide.

Improve | Web

Coffey, M. J. (2015). Perfect Depression Care Spread: The Traction of Zero Suicides. JCOM, 22(3).

Transition | Web

Boyer, C. A., McAlpine, D. D., Pottick, K. J., & Olfson, M. (2000). Identifying risk factors and key strategies in linkage to outpatient psychiatric care. American Journal of Psychiatry, 157(10), 1592-1598.

Treat | Web

Boyer, C. A., McAlpine, D. D., Pottick, K. J., & Olfson, M. (2000). Identifying risk factors and key strategies in linkage to outpatient psychiatric care. American Journal of Psychiatry, 157(10), 1592-1598.

Treat | Web

Reducing a suicidal person’s access to highly lethal means is an important part of a comprehensive approach to suicide prevention. This website from the Harvard School of Public Health describes how a person attempts suicide plays an important role in whether they live or die.

Treat | Web

Ahmedani, B. K., & Vannoy, S. (2014). National pathways for suicide prevention and health services research. American journal of preventive medicine, 47(3), S222-S228.

Treat | Web

Comtois, K. A., Jobes, D. A., S O'Connor, S., Atkins, D. C., Janis, K., E Chessen, C., ... & Yuodelis‐Flores, C. (2011). Collaborative assessment and management of suicidality (CAMS): feasibility trial for next‐day appointment services. Depression and Anxiety, 28(11), 963-972.

Treat | Web

Stanley, B., Brown, G., Brent, D. A., Wells, K., Poling, K., Curry, J., ... & Hughes, J. (2009). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP): treatment model, feasibility, and acceptability. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 48(10), 1005-1013.

Treat | Web

Berrouiguet, S., Gravey, M., Le Galudec, M., Alavi, Z., & Walter, M. (2014). Post-acute crisis text messaging outreach for suicide prevention: A pilot study. Psychiatry research, 217(3), 154-157.

Identify | Web

Following SAMHSA-funded evaluations that indicated the need for more consistent, uniform suicide risk assessment practices for crisis call centers, Lifeline assembled its Standards, Training & Practices Subcommittee (STPS). STPS developed evidence-informed Suicide Risk Assessment Standards and the Lifeline adopted these standards as policy, and verified full network membership adherence with these standards. The Suicide Risk Assessment Standards focus on four core principles: Suicidal Desire, Suicidal Capability, Suicidal Intent and Buffers along with the subcomponents for each.

Identify | Web

These worksheets from the SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions can help clinic managers, integrated care project directors, and billing/coding staff at community mental health centers and community health centers identify the available current procedural terminology codes they can use in their state to bill for services related to integrated primary and behavioral health care.

Transition | Web

This free, online training from the New York State Office of Mental Health and Columbia University describes what structured follow-up and monitoring is and how it can help suicidal individuals. Participants learn the typical three step procedure for conducting a structured follow-up. Behavioral healthcare practitioners in New York State working in non-profit settings can receive a certificate of completion by completing the training through the Center for Practice Innovations (CPI) Learning Community. Practitioners outside of New York State are not eligible to receive a certificate of completion.

Transition | Web

Luxton, D. D., June, J. D., & Comtois, K. A. (2013). Can postdischarge follow-up contacts prevent suicide and suicidal behavior? A review of the evidence. Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention, 34(1), 32.

Transition | Web

This comprehensive report authored by David Knesper, M.D., Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, offers recommendations for the ongoing care of patients at risk for suicide who have been treated in emergency departments and hospitals. It includes ten principles for improved continuity of care, and provides real-world examples of seven integrated systems of care in the U.S. and Europe. Other key recommendations for practice and research address: targeting high-risk individuals; improving education and training for suicide risk assessment; responding to patients who have become disengaged from treatment; coordinating care; and improving infrastructure to provide continuity of care.

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SPRC and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention are able to make this web site available thanks to support from Universal Health Services (UHS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (grant 1 U79 SM0559945).

No official endorsement by SAMHSA, DHHS, or UHS for the information on this web site is intended or should be inferred.