Resources

A multi-source collection of readings, tools, videos, and webinars to help you understand and implement Zero Suicide.

Displaying 16 - 30 of 169
Identify | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Identify element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Train | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Train element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Lead | PDF

A concise explainer of the research base for the Lead element of the Zero Suicide approach.

Transition | PDF

The Puyallup Tribal Health Authority developed a caring letter template that includes caring phrases in the Puyallup language with English translations. These culturally appropriate caring letters are sent in envelopes to protect client confidentiality.

Lead | Web

In this podcast trilogy, Rocky Mountain Short host Adam Hoffberg interviews three key Zero Suicide Champions who attended the 50th annual American Association of Suicidology conference. 

In "An Introduction to the Zero Suicide Initiative," Julie Goldstein-Grumet, who oversees the Zero Suicide Institute in her role as the Director of Health and Behavioral Health Initiatives at the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, discusses the foundation of Zero Suicide. She offers strategic direction to improve the effectiveness of behavioral health, clinical care, and primary care providers to recognize and respond to suicide emergencies.

Anthony Pisani of the University of Rochester Center for the Study and Prevention of Suicide discusses his model for suicide safer care, prevention-oriented risk formulation, and the need for a common framework for assessing, communicating, and responding to suicide risk for clinicians, patients, and the medical record in "A New Take on Zero Suicide and Risk Formulation."

Speaking from the Henry For Health System Center for Health Services Research, Brian Ahmandani discusses how the Zero Suicide initiative fits with the Center's investigation of ways to improve the quality, efficiency, and equality of health care. "Suicide Prevention in Health Systems" also discusses recent research findings on suicide preventions in health systems.

Improve | PDF, Web

In a Zero Suicide approach, a data-driven quality improvement approach involves assessing two main categories: fidelity to the essential systems, policy, and patient-care components of the Zero Suicide model, and patient-care outcomes that should come about when the organization implements those essential components. Zero Suicide implementation teams should identify key clinical care outcomes that indicate systems-level and clinical practice changes are having an impact, and establish systems to collect these data regularly to monitor areas for change and continuous improvement. Reviewing the existing quality improvement measures in the behavioral health field may be informative for establishing systematic data collection in your organization. In addition to quantitative data, organizations can also consider collecting qualitative data that assesses individuals’ experience and satisfaction receiving care. 

By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to (1) understand how data collection can be used to enhance the care that health and behavioral health care organizations provide to individuals at risk of suicide, (2) describe the current status of quality improvement measures in the suicide prevention field, and (3) describe how one organization used data to improve suicide risk assessment practices.

Transition | PDF

Bloomington Meadows Hospital of Indiana sends out handwritten care cards to patients after discharge. The care cards, like the two examples here, are created by receptionists, signed by the staff, and sent in an envelope for privacy. 

Train | PDF

The Institute for Family Health makes it a policy to provide all staff in their Psychosocial Services Department with training on suicide prevention. This document provides examples of IFH's regularly-offered trainings and the trainings required for each institutional role.

Transition | PDF

Community Counseling Center of Missouri invites clients to design caring contact cards through on-going contests. This collaboration with clients is designed to demonstrate provider care and reaffirm that lived experience matters to the Center. 

Engage | PDF

This document outlines the standard operating procedure for suicide risk assessment at Centerstone of Tennessee. The document supports Centerstone's policy that all individuals be screened for suicide risk at every service contact during the course of treatment.

Engage | PDF

The Institute for Family Health created a Managing Suicidality: Clinical Pathways in Primary and Behavioral Health Care resource to guide staff through their organization's approach to identification and response. 

Engage | Web

"Rocky Mountain Short Takes on Suicide Prevention: Talking to Patients about Firearm Safety" is a conversation about firearm safety between the host, Adam Hoffberg, and Emmy Betz, an emergency room physician at the University of Colorado Hospital. The conversation covers a range of topics regarding lethal means reduction. One of the highlights is a Colorado program called the Colorado Gun Shop Project, which is a collaboration with gun shop retailers, gun range owners, and firearm safety course instructors to promote suicide prevention. The podcast is twenty-six minutes long and can be found at the Rocky Mountain MIRECC for Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention website.

Treat | Web

Esther Tenorio, Project Director, Katishtya Embraces Youth Wellness and Hope (KEYWAH), San Felipe Pueblo, discusses aligning evidence-based programs with Indigenous ways of life.

Lead | PDF

A patient's death by suicide in health and behavioral healthcare organizations can have a significant impact on family members, other patients, and staff. It may be even more destabilizing or demoralizing in systems where significant changes to improve suicide care had been implemented. Optimal postvention practices in health and behavioral healthcare organizations highlight immediately supporting the family, other clients and staff, conducting root cause analyses, and embedding policies and protocols supporting postvention actions into the organization's operations. Consistent with a Zero Suicide framework, leadership should ensure that policies and practices promote an organizational response that is consistent with a just, no-blame culture that remains focused on continuous quality improvement in the aftermath of a patient suicide.

This webinar will focus on how health and behavioral healthcare organizations respond following a patient suicide death. Participants will hear from health care leaders and experts who will discuss key components of an organization-level postvention plan. They will explore considerations for supporting patients, staff and the community, and continuing to provide quality care. Additionally, a clinician survivor will share her perspective on what she felt was supportive after experiencing a patient suicide.

By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to (1) Explain how a health and behavioral health organization’s response to a suicide death can support improvements in suicide care practices; (2) Describe the role of Root Cause Analysis in a postvention response; and (3 )Identify steps that can be taken by organizations to support staff, other patients, and the family following a patient's death by suicide.

Transition | PDF

Centerstone of Tennessee developed this caring letter—in English and Spanish—with the help of Leah Harris. It is designed to be sent after other follow-up procedures (e.g., clinicians or others trained to do follow-up calls have reached out) have not been successful in reaching an individual who has been under your care.

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SPRC and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention are able to make this web site available thanks to support from Universal Health Services (UHS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (grant 1 U79 SM0559945).

No official endorsement by SAMHSA, DHHS, or UHS for the information on this web site is intended or should be inferred.