Resources

A multi-source collection of readings, tools, videos, and webinars to help you understand and implement Zero Suicide.

Displaying 1 - 15 of 143
Treat | Web

Esther Tenorio, Project Director, Katishtya Embraces Youth Wellness and Hope (KEYWAH), San Felipe Pueblo, discusses aligning evidence-based programs with Indigenous ways of life.

Lead | PDF

A patient's death by suicide in health and behavioral healthcare organizations can have a significant impact on family members, other patients, and staff. It may be even more destabilizing or demoralizing in systems where significant changes to improve suicide care had been implemented. Optimal postvention practices in health and behavioral healthcare organizations highlight immediately supporting the family, other clients and staff, conducting root cause analyses, and embedding policies and protocols supporting postvention actions into the organization's operations. Consistent with a Zero Suicide framework, leadership should ensure that policies and practices promote an organizational response that is consistent with a just, no-blame culture that remains focused on continuous quality improvement in the aftermath of a patient suicide.

This webinar will focus on how health and behavioral healthcare organizations respond following a patient suicide death. Participants will hear from health care leaders and experts who will discuss key components of an organization-level postvention plan. They will explore considerations for supporting patients, staff and the community, and continuing to provide quality care. Additionally, a clinician survivor will share her perspective on what she felt was supportive after experiencing a patient suicide.

By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to (1) Explain how a health and behavioral health organization’s response to a suicide death can support improvements in suicide care practices; (2) Describe the role of Root Cause Analysis in a postvention response; and (3 )Identify steps that can be taken by organizations to support staff, other patients, and the family following a patient's death by suicide.

Transition | PDF

Centerstone of Tennessee developed these caring letters – in English and Spanish - with the help of Leah Harris. They are designed to be sent after other follow-up procedures (e.g., clinicians or others trained to do follow-up calls have reached out to them) haven’t been successful in reaching an individual who has been under your care.

Train | PDF

This is a sample Zero Suicide Workforce Survey results report with randomly generated responses. You can use this as a guide to help you plan your survey analysis and communication about your survey results with staff.

Train | PDF

This resource was designed to help you administer the Workforce Survey by answering some frequently asked questions.

Train | PDF

The Zero Suicide Workforce Survey is the ideal tool to use to assess staff knowledge, practices, and confidence.

Train | Web
Training Workshops | Web

Emergency departments (EDs) play an important role in suicide prevention. The self-paced online course, Preventing Suicide in Emergency Department Patients, teaches healthcare professionals who work in an ED how to conduct screening, assessment, and brief interventions, such as safety planning and lethal means counseling. It also addresses patient-centered care for patients with suicide risk, patient safety during the ED visit, and incorporating suicide prevention into discharge planning. This course was created by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center at EDC, Inc. with funding from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.

Lead | Web

In this podcast, Jonathan B. Singer, Ph.D., LCSW interviews David W. Covington, LPC, MBA regarding the importance of healthcare systems adopting and implementing Zero Suicide initiatives.

Suicide Care Management Plan | Web

The Real Warriors Campaign is a multimedia public awareness campaign designed to encourage help-seeking behavior among service members, veterans and military families coping with invisible wounds. Launched by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) in 2009, the campaign is an integral part of the Defense Department’s overall effort to encourage warriors and families to seek appropriate care and support for psychological health concerns.

There is an increased focus on providing evidence-based care in both the military and civilian health care systems. Since 1998, the Defense Department (DoD) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have worked together to develop CPGs for treating psychological and physical health concerns. The departments’ working groups create the guidelines based, in part, on the readiness needs of service members and veterans.

The Institute of Medicine defines clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) as “statements that include recommendations intended to optimize patient care that are informed by a systematic review of evidence and an assessment of the benefits and harms of alternative care options.”

CPGs create consistency of care. They can support provider and patient decisions about appropriate care for specific concerns but should not replace a provider’s best judgment.

Potential Benefits for Health Professionals

CPG use can lead to a number of advantages that positively affect both the providers and patients. If implemented correctly, CPGs can:

  • Improve quality of clinical decisions and care
  • Offer clear recommendations for providers
  • Promote efficient use of resources
  • Streamline access to resources
Screening and Assessment | Web

Most clinicians-in-training learn to summarize suicide risk in a categorical probability judgment expressed as low, moderate, or high, often with gradations like low-moderate. But what do we really mean when we say a patient is at “low” “moderate” or “high” risk? Risk compared to whom? Compared to when? In what setting? These labels are devoid of context, lack predictive validity, and provide little help when developing plans and responses to prevent suicide.  In this Suicide Prevention Resource Center Director's Corner, Anthony Pisani, PhD explains moving away from a prediction model to a prevention model.

Transition | PDF

Centerstone of Tennessee developed this Memorandum of Understanding with emergency departments to enhance follow-up services for clients.

Lead | Web

Copyrighted and published by Project HOPE/Health Affairs as: Michael F. Hogan and Julie Goldstein Grumet “Suicide Prevention: An Emerging Priority For Health Care” Health Affairs (Millwood) 2016, Vol. 35, No. 6, 1084-1090. The published article is archived and available online at www.healthaffairs.org.

Lead | Web

Stefan, S. (2016). Rational Suicide, Irrational Laws: Examining Current Approaches to Suicide in Policy and Law. Oxford University Press.

Lead | PDF

Health and behavioral health care (HBH) organizations and providers implementing suicide prevention practices often have concerns about liability and legal issues. Providing quality patient care while minimizing liability risk is a priority across HBH organizations, especially when caring for patients at risk for suicide. Liability risks can be reduced when providers deliver patient-centered care with embedded systems-level communication and documentation practices.

Health and behavioral health care organizations can support providers and manage risk by adopting practices that ensure: suicide risk is properly identified and assessed; timely and effective treatment that allows for patient choice and involvement is provided; patient health information is appropriately communicated between providers, patients and collaterals; and documentation is thorough.

This webinar will explore the legal and liability issues related to implementing systems-level changes designed to improve suicide care practices. Participants will hear from three experts who will discuss common liability concerns including those related to confidentiality and HIPAA, key elements considered in liability cases, and strategies to minimize liability against a provider or health care organization.

By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to (1) Identify misconceptions related to provider liability in litigation involving patient suicide; (2) Describe suicide care practices that are of particular importance in liability cases; and (3) Explain system- or organizational-level improvements to suicide care that can enhance an organization’s abilities to deliver quality care and minimize liability concerns. 

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SPRC and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention are able to make this web site available thanks to support from Universal Health Services (UHS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (grant 1 U79 SM0559945).

No official endorsement by SAMHSA, DHHS, or UHS for the information on this web site is intended or should be inferred.